OCD or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
 

Living With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

A person that suffers from obsessive compulsive disorder has the live with anxiety and fear all of the time. OCD behaviors come in many forms, all of which are just a little different but can have the same paralyzing affects.

If you think that living with obsessive compulsive disorder is an easy road to drive, the truth may shock you.  People that live with the fears that go along with obsessive compulsive disorder can turn in life into a complete mess in a hurry.  If you are unfamiliar with what obsessive compulsive disorder is, here is a brief overview for you.  This article will tell you the warning signs and explain just how hard it is to cope on a day to day basis.

A person that suffers from obsessive compulsive disorder has the live with anxiety and fear all of the time.  OCD behaviors come in many forms, all of which are just a little different but can have the same paralyzing affects.   The fear of not having everything clean is probably the most common form, or at least the most heard about form of this disorder.  People with this form of OCD live with the fear that they are vulnerable to everything and if things are not perfectly clean, they will become sick with the next sickness or disease.  They are very paranoid and easily upset if someone that is "unclean" touches them or their belongings. 

The checker, as it is sometimes called, has to check and recheck everything that they do, sometimes even what they say.  People with these tendencies have a very hard time getting even the simplest task done and it can be so stressful that they drive themselves crazy.  Take for example, washing and rewashing dishes; rechecking appliances multiple times after you have turned them off; locking your door a million and a half times, sometimes meaning you have to go back after you have left to check.  A person with this checking mentality has a fear that whatever they forget will come back to haunt them, with disastrous consequences and they do not want to be to blame. 

Articles On Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

This article will explore the OCD tendencies of canines and how humans can help their animals cope. OCD behaviors in canines resembles that of humans in that dogs demonstrate repetitive behaviors, apparently without being able to control it. The onset can be both gradual and sudden, depending on what triggered the behavior. Moreover, what behaviors are demonstrated depends on what type of breed the dog is. It is most common for longhaired dogs to over groom themselves. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
 

You may think that finding the need to have everything neat and tidy all the time is a good trait to have.  Although this is so to the common person, to someone that suffers from OCD, it is a little more complicated than that.  To such a person, everything around them has to be neat and tidy and must be in the place designated for it.  They forever spend time organizing and reorganizing before and after any task.  They are easily angered if someone comes to their home and touches the slightest thing.  They expect things to be where they put it at all times.   They literally can drive themselves nuts when things get in disarray, namely because it wasn't them that did it.

Lastly and probably most seriously, is the obsessive thinker.  People that suffer from obsessive thoughts spend most of their time trying to make themselves think of something other than scary thoughts and images.  They are literally scared of the world, other people and sometimes even themselves.  The obsessive thinking can be downright dangerous, as they find themselves thinking about hurting others and in some cases, they think about suicide.  It is not at all uncommon for people with this disorder to be seen as crazy to the outside world.  They seem to be in their own world, namely because their focus is on counting, praying or any other activity of the mind that will take away the bad thoughts that they have. 

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