Basic Facts About Cholesterol
◦  Children Can Be Affected By High Cholesterol
◦  Cholesterol and Your Child
◦  Cholesterol Level Facts
◦  The Top Dangers Associated With High Cholesterol
◦  What to do About Cholesterol Numbers
◦  Older Americans and Cholesterol
◦  Preventing High Cholesterol Levels
◦  Understanding Your Cholesterol Test
◦  At-home Cholesterol Tests
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Basic Facts About Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a substance that is found in the lipids (fats) in your bloodstream and also in all of the cells in your body. It is a substance that is needed by your body to build cell membranes, certain hormones and is also used in other functions as well.

 

Not all cholesterol is bad, knowing the difference between good cholesterol and bad cholesterol and what you need to know about cholesterol and your diet can help to keep you healthy and your heart strong.

There are three important things to do regarding you, your health and your cholesterol. The first is to know about cholesterol and the connection it has to your health, especially your heart health.

The second thing to know about cholesterol is what your good and bad cholesterol levels are by going to your doctor and having them tested. Lastly, it is a good thing to get on a healthy diet to maintain good cholesterol levels and to maintain the proper level of daily exercise.

Doing these 3 things regarding cholesterol will help you stay healthy and keep your heart strong.


Knowing all about cholesterol:

Cholesterol is a substance that is found in the lipids (fats) in your bloodstream and also in all of the cells in your body. It is a substance that is needed by your body to build cell membranes, certain hormones and is also used in other functions as well. When you have a high level of cholesterol in your bloodstream it may be an indication that you have a high risk for heart disease.

Because cholesterol cannot be dissolved in the bloodstream it has to be carried along between cells by lipoproteins. There are several of these but the two we hear most about are the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and the high-density lipoprotein (HDL).

You have probably heard of these names on TV commercials, while talking with neighbors or perhaps you have already had your levels checked and you know what your numbers are.

Low Cholesterol Diet

Limit the amount of meats, pastries, cookies, and other snack food items from your diet to eliminate all those empty calories and your body and your heart will thank you. Ask your doctor about medications that can increase or decrease cholesterol levels. This way if you are ever placed on these medications in the future you can advise the doctor who is prescribing the medication that you are concerned about the affect it may have on your cholesterol levels. Not all doctors know about all the medications that other doctors may have you on, so advising all your medical care professionals about the medications you are taking is a smart move when it comes to medication interactions as well as the affect some medications can have on other health issues than what individual doctors are treating you for. If you should ever be placed on a medication that is known to have an affect on cholesterol levels make sure that a doctor will be monitoring your lipid levels while you are taking the medication. Low Cholesterol Diet


Knowing what your cholesterol levels are:

LDL cholesterol is called the "bad" cholesterol because it can slowly build up in the walls of the arteries that feed both the heart and the brain if there is too much of it.

If you have a high LDL level you are at high risk for heart disease and if you have a low level of LDL you are at low risk for heart disease.

The HDL cholesterol is called the "good" cholesterol because a high HDL level protects you against a heart attack as it removes excess cholesterol from plaques and slows their growth.

If you have a low level of HDL you are at high risk for heart disease and if you have a high level of HDL you have a low risk for heart disease.

Maintaining a healthy diet and proper daily exercise:

Your body produces approximately 1000 milligrams of cholesterol a day, which is one way you receive cholesterol in your body.

The second way cholesterol enters your body is by the foods that you eat that contain cholesterol. Foods from animals contain cholesterol such as egg yolks, meat poultry, whole and reduced fat milk and dairy products as well as shellfish. Plant foods do not contain cholesterol.

Foods such as nuts, grains, vegetables, seeds and fruits are plant foods.